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«Unit introduction This unit provides knowledge and an understanding of the racing industry as a whole, from the development of the thoroughbred ...»

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Unit 19: Introduction to the Horse

Racing Industry

Unit code: R/601/1520

QCF Level 3: BTEC National

Credit value: 10

Guided learning hours: 60

Aim and purpose

This unit aims to provide learners with an introduction to some of the operations and activities of horse racing

in Great Britain. This unit is primarily aimed at learners within a centre-based setting looking to progress into the sector or to further education and training.

Unit introduction This unit provides knowledge and an understanding of the racing industry as a whole, from the development of the thoroughbred breed, to the present-day racing industry. This will give learners the chance to look at the industry as a possible employment avenue and the skills required to work in the industry.

Learners will look at the development of the thoroughbred breeding industry from the foundation stallions to studs, funding and sales. They will gain an overview of the industry from its early beginnings to the present day. The complexities of the industry, in terms of the organisations that are involved and the sales and breeding of thoroughbreds, will also be reviewed.

Learners will research the procedures that are involved in racing, for example, licensing, categories of races, the racing calendar and the race day procedures.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit a learner should:

1 Know the operation, administration and financing of TB racing and breeding in the UK 2 Understand the activities carried out in a racing yard 3 Know the main procedures and documentation in racing yards 4 Be able to use information for the selection of breeding and racing stock.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Horse Management – Issue 1 – September 2010 © Edexcel Limited 2010 Unit content 1 Know the operation, administration and financing of TB racing and breeding in the UK Thoroughbred bloodlines: foundation stallions and their significance (Byerley Turk, Godolphin Arabian, Darley Arabian); breeding year of the thoroughbred; pedigrees; general stud book; Weatherbys Betting industry and income: organisations eg Horserace Betting Levy Board (Capital Fund, National Joint Pitch Council (NJPC), Independent Betting Arbitration Service, The Levy, private bookmakers; betting duty; allocation of betting income; betting on and off the course; prize money; sponsorship; TV and press coverage Key organisations: eg Jockey Club, British Horseracing Authority, Weatherbys, Racecourse Association, National Trainers Federation, Racehorse Owners Association, Injured Jockeys Fund, Stable Lads Welfare Trust, National Association of Stable Staff, Racecourse Association, Retraining of Racehorses, Thoroughbred Breeders Association (TBA), European Breeders Fund; Levy Board; role of organisation in racing 2 Understand the activities carried out in a racing yard Geographical factors: reasons for location of racing centres; influence of topography; racecourses eg turf, all weather, floodlit; breeding regions of UK and Ireland Categories of race and seasonal influences: flat; National Hunt; Point to Point; professional; amateur;

condition races; handicaps; maidens; claimers; sellers; bumpers; amateur riders; conditional jockeys;

apprentice races; group and listed races; entry systems in UK and Ireland Routines: daily routines at different times of race and non-race day eg horse husbandry, horse exercise, horse health and medical requirements, movement of horses; staff roles and responsibilities eg trainer, stable lad, stable staff, jockeys 3 Know the main procedures and documentation requirements in racing yards The racing calendar and major fixture list: different racing seasons; major fixtures (dates, location, type eg Order of Merit) Licensing/permit requirements: trainers; jockeys (professional and amateur); owners; colours; horses; stable staff; licensing process; registration; identity cards/passes Registration procedures: qualification of foals; brood mares and stallions; stallion syndicate; nonthoroughbred register; owner registration; registration of colours Racecourse procedures: declaration to run; pre-parade; paddock; to start; stalls; winners enclosure; drug testing; weighed out and in Race planning: race planning committee; annual planning; horse plan; race entries Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Horse Management 2 – Issue 1 – September 2010 © Edexcel Limited 2010 4 Be able to use information for the selection of breeding and racing stock Selection of stock: bloodstock market; pedigree, sires and dams (generations, common ancestors); role of bloodstock agents; public sales; private sales; records; sales seasons; sales statistics; auction (sales, catalogue, results, assessment and selection of stallions and mares); sales companies eg Tattersalls, Doncaster Bloodstock, Ascot Bloodstock Sales; use of information to select stock Stud business: public and private studs; marketing of stallions; stallion being ‘shuttled’ Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Horse Management – Issue 1 – September 2010 © Edexcel Limited 2010 Assessment and grading criteria In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.





–  –  –

PLTS: This summary references where applicable, in the square brackets, the elements of the personal, learning and thinking skills applicable in the pass criteria. It identifies opportunities for learners to demonstrate effective application of the referenced elements of the skills.

–  –  –

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Horse Management – Issue 1 – September 2010 © Edexcel Limited 2010 Essential guidance for tutors Delivery Tutors delivering this unit have opportunities to use as wide a range of techniques as possible. Lectures, discussions, seminar presentations, site visits, supervised practicals, internet and/or library-based research and the use of personal and/or industrial experience would all be suitable. Delivery should stimulate, motivate, educate and enthuse learners. Tutors should integrate changes in the seasonal nature of the racing calendar into delivery of the unit.

Work placements should be monitored regularly in order to ensure the quality of the learning experience. It would be beneficial if learners and supervisors were made aware of the requirements of this unit prior to any work-related activities so that naturally occurring evidence can be collected at the time. For example, learners may have the opportunity to categorise different races, and they should be encouraged to ask for observation records and/or witness statements to be provided as evidence of this. Guidance on the use of observation records and witness statements is provided on the Edexcel website.

Health and safety issues relating to working with horses must be stressed and regularly reinforced, and risk assessments must be undertaken prior to any practical activities.

Tutors should consider integrating the delivery, private study and assessment for this unit with other relevant units and assessment instruments learners are taking as part of their programme of study.

This unit should be mostly classroom-based to give learners the underpinning knowledge needed, although visits will play a large part in the delivery to support this.

Learning outcome 1 covers the background development of the Thoroughbred, industry finance and key organisations. Delivery is likely to be in the form of formal lectures, discussion, site visits and independent learner research. The history of the horse breeds will start the development of the knowledge for this industry. A minimum of one visit to a main racing venue and/or related organisation should be included in delivery of this learning outcome.

Learning outcome 2 covers racing yards, their location and running. Delivery is likely to be in the form of formal lectures, discussion, site visits and independent learner research. Appropriate visits will add to the relevance of the subject for learners, for example visits to various racing yards.

Learning outcomes 3 and 4 cover procedures and documentation related to racing. Delivery is likely to be in the form of formal lectures, discussion, site visits and independent learner research and speakers.

Outline learning plan The outline learning plan has been included in this unit as guidance and can be used in conjunction with the programme of suggested assignments.

The outline learning plan gives an indication of the volume of learning it would take the average learner to achieve the learning outcomes. It is indicative and is one way of achieving the credit value.

Learning time should address all learning (including assessment) relevant to the learning outcomes, regardless of where, when and how the learning has taken place.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Horse Management 6 – Issue 1 – September 2010 © Edexcel Limited 2010 Topic and suggested assignments/activities and/assessment Introduction to the unit.

Assignment 1: Racing Business (P1, P2, P3, P6, M1, D1) Introduction to the assignment and learner-centred research.

Research into thoroughbred bloodlines. Investigation into the industry, key organisations and current issues.

Assignment 2: The Racing Yard (P4, P5, P6, P7, M2) Introduction to the assignment and learner-centred research.

Research of duties and responsibilities in the racing yard. Consideration of different categories of racing.

Assignment 3: Racing Day (P7, P8, P9, P10, P11, P12, P13, M3, D2) Introduction to the assignment and learner-centred research.

Demonstration of licensing and racing procedures.

Planning and taking part in a racing day.

Unit review.

Assessment For P1, learners must outline the history and development of the thoroughbred breed. Learners are expected to show knowledge of the foundation stallions that established the development of the thoroughbred as a breed. This could be undertaken in the form of a presentation to the class (using appropriate software or an overhead projector), or a poster. Group work could be encouraged, but learners must be assessed for their input independently. If assessed through observation this must be recorded adequately.

P2 requires learners to identify the key organisations involved in the regulation, governance and administration of racing and thoroughbred breeding. This could be done in the form of a project that could be integrated into the assessment of M1 and D1.

For P3, learners must analyse the geographical factors influencing the distribution of racecourses and racing yards in the UK. Evidence could be in the format of an annotated map of the UK providing information on different regions in relation to racing venues.

P4 and P5 require learners to demonstrate their investigation of yard routines, role and responsibilities. Tutors should identify the yard(s) or agree these through discussion with learners. The roles and responsibilities should be in the context of a trainer, head lad, travelling head lad, work rider and stable staff where relevant.

Where possible, to ensure fairness of assessment the size and complexity of the tasks should be the same for all learners. A project could be undertaken and this could be linked to evidence being presented by learners for M2.

For P6, P7, P8 and P9, learners need to provide information on the racing calendar, licensing/permits and how to document and register horses for racing. Evidence could be provided through a mixture of recorded observations, completed documentation and assignment work.

For P10, P11, P12 and P13, learners need to undertake various research activities around the selection of breeding and racing stock. Evidence could be provided through a mixture of recorded observations, completed documentation and assignment work.

M1 requires learners to describe financing of the horse racing industry. Evidence for this could be shown in the form of a table, graph, written report or project to clearly demonstrate how funds are apportioned.

Alternatively, it could be linked to the work undertaken by learners giving evidence for P2 and D1.

For M2, learners must discuss the ownership and running of a given racing yard. This could be done in the Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Horse Management – Issue 1 – September 2010 © Edexcel Limited 2010 form of a project, presentation with notes (possibly using appropriate software or an overhead projector) or a poster. Evidence could be linked to P4 and/or P5.

For M3, learners must explain the process of breeding and registering thoroughbred horses. Learners should show they have researched the process that they would go through to register a thoroughbred foal. This could be done in the form of observation during a race or presentation with notes (possibly using appropriate software or an overhead projector).

For D1, learners must discuss selected organisations and current issues related to bloodstock trade and business, for example those around gambling and illegal practices. Tutors should identify the organisations or agree them through discussion with the learners. Where possible, to ensure fairness of assessment the size and complexity of the tasks should be the same for all learners. Learners should research organisations, for example the difference between public and private studs, then look at the role of the bloodstock trade. This could be achieved in the form of a short test or in the form of a project and integrated with the work being undertaken for P2 and M1.

D2 requires learners to explain selected licensing processes. Tutors should identify the processes or agree them through discussion with the learners. Where possible, to ensure fairness of assessment the size and complexity of the tasks should be the same for all learners. They could research the licensing process for example of a trainer or jockey and include an interview of the trainer or jockey with regard to what they have to do to achieve their required licences. This could be in the form of discussion, or a poster or it can be linked to work being undertaken by learners giving evidence for P7 and M3.



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